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Stem Cell Mobilization Protocols: Filgrastim vs. Mozobil

Lily C. Trajman, Ph.D. ltrajman@webwriting.com Introduction Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are primitive cells capable of both self renewal and producing progenitor cells that can differentiate into all the cells of the hematopoietic system (Figure 1). Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is an increasingly common therapy used to treat a number of cancers,including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and solid tumors such as neuroblastomas and Ewing’s Sarcoma (Ali, 2015). It can al...

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Cryopreservation of Primary Mammalian Cells

Lily C. Trajman, Ph.D. ltrajman@webwriting.com Background Ex vivo cell-based therapies for are increasingly being used as first line treatments for a variety of diseases. However, primary cells are difficult to maintain in cell culture, and often long term culture leads to loss of pluripotency and/or functionality, rendering the cells unsuitable for use in therapy. Cryopreservation of early passage primary cells in liquid nitrogen essentially freezes the cells in time, allowing them to be used...

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Leukopak 101: A Brief Review of Apheresis

Lily C. Trajman, Ph.D. ltrajman@webwriting.com Introduction Apheresis refers to the process by which blood is removed from a patient and separated into its constituent parts, allowing the removal of one specific component from the blood while the remainder is returned to the patient. Apheresis was first described over 100 years ago – by John Abel in 1914 – and has been used as a therapy for a number of different diseases, including sickle cell anemia and certain types of cancer (Korsack, 2016)...

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Chimeric Antigen Receptors and Personalized Immunotherapy

T cells stand at the apex of the immune surveillance system. T cells become activated after the T cell receptor (TCR) binds its cognate peptide in the context of cell surface proteins encoded by the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) family of genes on an antigen presenting cell (APC). The requirement of recognizing both MHC and peptide makes TCR binding a more complex interaction than the relatively simple binding of B cell antibody to antigen. Once a TCR binds to its cognate peptide-MHC th...

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